more old photos of Hancock Horses



click here to see full size
Steel Bars
sire: Three Bars (TB)
dam: Joan P-3246 (sired by Joe Hancock)
click on above sale bill to see full size
this was submitted by Hayden Dunsworth & his Dad,
it is from the September 1957 Quarter Horse Journal





Quarter Hancock, 18.75% Joe Hancock
1959 roan; 15.2 -1/2 hh
sire: Lowry Hancock (Roan Hancock x Lowry Girl 2)
dam: Ada Maid (Chock x Snip Sa Wa Na)
he sired 223 foals with 28 performers
His last foal was sired in 1987 (one).
He died in 1986 at age 27 (date of death was gotten from his owner).

His performers included:
2 NIRA Champion Breakaway -- Quarter's Comet and Quarter's Patch.
His AQHA performers included Quarter's Missy ..race starter, money earner,
15 wrkg, 137.5 youth wrkg points (Youth barrel racing and stake racing).
Quarter's Topsy ...9 wrkg, 83 youth points ( Youth barrel racing and stake racing)

Quarter Hancock was also a top sire of rope and ranch horses.

Photo is from an old copy of the Quarter Horse Journal.
Submitted by Roz Smietanski




Flicka Hancock, AQHA 2877
by Roan Hancock Jr (by Roan Hancock)
out of Pat S (by Joe Hancock)
Flicka Hancock was 37.5% Joe Hancock blood





Plenty Coup; by Texas Bluebonnet, by Joe Hancock
photo taken from Come to the Source Sale catalog




Flit AA, ROM Race, SI-85
sired by Leo, out of Julie W (by Joe Hancock)

Flit was the dam, granddam and great-granddam of
1 Supreme Champion,
44 AQHA Champions,
3 Superior Cutting Horses,
10 Superior Halter Horses,
11 Superior Performers,
3 Hi-Pt Performers,
2 Honor Roll Performance Champions



Two different views of the great mare Flit...one as a young mare in her racing prime...
and this as an older broodmare.

When bred to Sugar Bars, Flit produced the stallion Flit Bar whose name is synomous with NFR quality barrel racing get ... and who went on to sire sons Firewater Flit and Dr. Nick Bar.

When bred to King P234, Flit produced King's Pistol the first stallion to be an NCHA World Champion Cutting Horse... he was also the sire of AAA speed, cutting/cowhorse and superior arena champions.

When bred to Three Bars, Flit produced Leo Bar AAA who sired stallions like King Leo Bar AAA, AQHA Champion... who's blood can still be found in successful horses from the show ring to the cowhorse & rodeo arena today.







Osage Roan 1958 roan
by Little Roan Hancock, son of Roan Hancock
last owned by Jim Overstreet
, MT



Most accounts of Joe Hancock describe him as a big horse who stood a solid 16 hands. That, however, is not the way Tom Hancock remembers the stallion:

"He stood 15.2 or maybe 15.3," he attested, "but certainly not 16. He was dark brown with that white blaze running down his face. That much I do remember."

"Daddy and Uncle Bird (Ogles) agreed on another quality about Joe… his conformation. They used to say they couldn't improve on it for racing even if they could take a pencil and literally redraw it."

"Regardless of what anyone may have said about Joe Hancock, there were some noted horsemen in whose opinion he was outstanding. Elmer Hepler often said he was one of the best-looking horses he'd ever seen.

Tom Burnett of the 6666/Triangle Ranch was also quoted as saying Joe was one of the most outstanding-looking horses he'd ever looked at.

Newt Keck, who saw Joe when he was a 2 and 3 year old, always insisted Joe could go to the track today and not be out of place in terms of conformation. He said he looked good then and he'd still look good today. He further said Joe had the best hip and one of the heaviest loins he'd ever seen on a horse. My mother, Cora Hancock, always said Joe was not only good looking but a perfect gentleman as well."

"It's been 47 years since Joe Hancock died and he's still influencing the industry. I don't think anyone - not even P.T. Barnum himself -- could fool the public that long! To me, Joe Hancock himself was his own greatest promoter. To me, his unquestioned prepotency in the stud is the reason his bloodlines are still being sought today."


Excerpt from: "Joe Hancock - Tom Hancock tells the story of this great Quarter Horse stallion."
By Diane Ciarloni Simmons;  The Western Horseman / November 1990



"His (Joe Hancock) blood still contributes to the athletic and mental ability of present day using horses."


Excerpt From: Horse Tradin and Other Tales, by Ralph Dye



"Ike's Still After 'Em"


Ike Rude and his unregistered grulla gelding, "Grulla"
"...daddy of the horse is a son of Blue Bonnet Hancock."

"As ropers know, a Hancock-bred horse is sure nice to have
under saddle when roping calves or steers."

Photo and quotes from the article, "Ike's Still After 'Em"
by Chuck King; The Western Horseman, November 1970




"So we begin to see that a truly great Quarter Horse family is one deriving from a single stallion, who begets sons who in turn become great sires themselves. And through this breeding process, which can continue on for generations, the qualities and characteristics of the original founding stallion are maintained faithfully - even perhaps improved on in certain sensational breeding nicks."

"Still another requisite of an outstanding family line is the ability of sons or grandsons or great grandsons of the original sire to start their own line - a sort of family within a family."

"What professional rodeo roper has not heard of Joe Hancock, the original sire of a line of rugged, active, and speedy calf and steer horses? He was by John Wilkens by Peter McCue, and he sired, among others, Red Man, Roan Hancock, Hancock King, and Joe Hancock Jr. And these sons of old Joe in turn sired some of the best short-distance race horses and rodeo rope horses in the Southwest."

"Joe Hancock Jr., got Pelican, an extremely fast straightaway race horse; Roan Hancock got Roper and Dusty Hancock, both arena mounts and racers; and Red Man got Worryman, Wampus Kitty, and John Red, race horses, and a whole barn full of arena horses, registered and unregistered."


Excerpt from: How to Enjoy the Quarter Horse / Chapter 15 / "Are Quarter Horse Families Important?"
1973 by Willard H. Porter








Chuck King on Roany at the State Fair in Pueblo, CO in 1965.
Roany a 1956 unregistered roan gelding by Blue Boy Appelt by Roan Hancock Jr.
Chuck King described Roany as gentle as a kitten and the kind of horse that,
as ropers say, "you couldn't drive past a set of heels."

(note no tie-down)

Photo & information taken from the article:
"I Remember... Roany" by Chuck King.
The Western Horseman / January, 1986



Copper Hancock by Blue Hancock (by Joe Hancock) out of Hot Shot Quarter Mare.
Copper Hancock is a paternal brother to Seminole Charlie,
and the mare Seminole Lucy, the dam of Hancocks Duplicate and Ryolite.


Submitted by Lee Jones






Pelican, world champion racing stallion 1947. By Joe Hancock Jr. and out of a TB mare



Pelican, another view

Submitted by Lee Jones








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